THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA – 2012

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Posted on 11th March 2012 by Administrator in Economy |Politics |Social Issues

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The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; the second is war. Both bring a temporary prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. But both are the refuge of political and economic opportunists.” Ernest Hemingway

 

“Though the Federal Reserve policy harms the average American, it benefits those in a position to take advantage of the cycles in monetary policy. The main beneficiaries are those who receive access to artificially inflated money and/or credit before the inflationary effects of the policy impact the entire economy. Federal Reserve policies also benefit big spending politicians who use the inflated currency created by the Fed to hide the true costs of the welfare-warfare state.” Ron Paul

Ernest Hemingway and Ron Paul never met. Ron Paul was completing medical school in 1961 when Hemingway committed suicide at his home in Idaho. I think they would have hit it off. I stumbled across the quote from Hemingway above. Those words could have come directly out of the mouth of Ron Paul. Both men spent their whole lives seeking the truth and presenting their ideas in a blunt straightforward manner. Hemingway is one of the most renowned writers in American history, with classics such as A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Sun Also Rises to his credit. He won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1954. He constructed a new literary style characterized by lean, hard, sparse dialogue. He influenced literature and young authors for decades. As a teenager I was immediately drawn to his gritty realistic novels. There was no nonsense to his novels. They always involved man’s struggle against death and hardship. Most of his best work was done in the 1920s and 1930s, but he produced one of his finest works in 1951 towards the end of his life. Hemingway won the Pulitzer Prize for his story about an epic battle between an old man and a great marlin.

Ernest Hemingway was bigger than life. Hemingway’s real life reads like a Stephen Spielberg Indiana Jones movie. He was an ambulance driver in World War I, where he was seriously wounded. He had four wives. He lived in Paris during the 1920s associating with other famous “Lost Generation” writers. He was a correspondent during the Spanish Civil War and World War II, while also joining in the fighting. He survived two plane crashes and multiple car accidents. He battled alcoholism and mental illness, eventually taking his own life, just as his father, brother and sister had done before him. His novels reflected the pain, struggle and inevitability of death that permeated his own life.

The Old Man and the Sea is a novel about Santiago, an old fisherman whose life is approaching its conclusion, and his final heroic struggle against a great marlin and the evil sharks that ultimately devour his prize. The mark of a great writer is the ability to tell a story that means many things to many people. Hemingway described his aim in writing this novel:

“No good book has ever been written that has in it symbols arrived at beforehand and stuck in. … I tried to make a real old man, a real boy, a real sea and a real fish and real sharks. But if I made them good and true enough they would mean many things.”

His novels always had a gritty reality to them. This particular novel is rich with symbolism and life lessons that are timeless and relevant today. The plot of the story is quite basic, but the character analysis reveals much deeper insights. For eighty-four days, Santiago, an aged Cuban fisherman, has set out to sea and returned empty-handed. So strikingly unlucky is he that the parents of his young, devoted apprentice and friend, Manolin, have forced the boy to leave the old man in order to fish in a more prosperous boat. On the eighty-fifth day he decides to sail far into the Gulf Stream past where most fishermen would dare venture alone. A big fish, which he knows is a marlin, takes the bait that Santiago has placed one hundred fathoms deep in the waters. The old man expertly hooks the fish, but he cannot pull it in. Instead, the fish begins to pull the boat.

Unable to tie the line fast to the boat for fear the fish would snap a taut line, the old man bears the strain of the line with his shoulders, back, and hands, ready to give slack should the marlin make a run. The great fish pulls the boat for two straight days. The entire time, Santiago endures constant pain from the fishing line. Whenever the fish lunges, leaps, or makes a dash for freedom, the cord cuts Santiago badly. Although wounded and weary, the old man feels a deep empathy and admiration for the marlin, his brother in suffering, strength, and resolve. On the third day, the fish tires and Santiago is able to kill him with his harpoon. He lashes it to the side of the boat and begins the long journey home.

As Santiago navigates toward his destination, the marlin’s blood leaves a trail in the water and attracts sharks. The first to attack is a great mako shark, which Santiago manages to slay with the harpoon. In the struggle, the old man loses the harpoon, which leaves him vulnerable to more shark attacks. The vicious predator sharks continuously attack Santiago’s trophy and despite killing several of the sharks, his battle became ultimately hopeless. He fights a gallant fight, revealing man’s finest qualities of bravery, confidence, courage, patience, optimism, and intelligence during the struggle.

The scavengers devour the marlin’s precious meat, leaving only skeleton, head, and tail. Santiago chastises himself for going “out too far,” and for sacrificing his great and worthy opponent. He arrives home before daybreak, stumbles back to his shack, and sleeps very deeply. The next morning, a crowd of amazed fishermen gathers around the skeletal carcass of the fish, which is still lashed to the boat. Manolin, who had been worried sick over the old man’s absence, is moved to tears when he finds Santiago safe in his bed. The boy fetches the old man some coffee and the daily papers with the baseball scores, and watches him sleep. When the old man awakens, the two agree to fish as partners once more. The old man returns to sleep and dreams his usual dream of lions at play on the beaches of Africa.

Sadness, resignation and the inevitability of death permeate the pages of this brilliant novel. But it is grace under pressure in the face of overwhelming odds that is the true message Hemingway leaves with the reader. There is no avoiding death, but the critical test of mankind is how you live your life and how you endure the suffering and pain that are inflicted upon you.

The Honor in Struggle, Defeat & Death

“But man is not made for defeat,” he said. “A man can be destroyed but not defeated.” –  Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea 

     

“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” - Ernest Hemingway

Life is a journey. At the end of every worldly journey, death awaits. That is a certainty. The ending will be the same for everyone who walks this earth. What matters is the course chosen on the voyage through life. The vast sea represents life’s journey, with its ebbs, flows, and storms that must be navigated. In Hemingway’s portrait of the world, death is inevitable, but the finest men will nonetheless refuse to give in to its power.  In both the sea and in life, there are a number of possibilities that lie hidden from the common eye; some are gifts to be treasured and some are problems to be defeated. Neither will be found unless man embarks upon the journey. If man is lucky enough to discover a treasure he must fight until death to retain it; if man is unlucky enough to discover an evil lurking underneath the surface of the sea, he must fight it bravely and nobly until the end. In either case, it is the struggle that is all- important, and a man obtains the status of hero if he battles the sea (life) with grace under pressure. The only way to obtain the status of hero is to set sail on the uncertain sea of life.

Ron Paul, trained as a doctor in the early 1960s, served his country as an Air Force flight surgeon from 1963 through 1968 during the Vietnam War. He’s been married for 54 years and has raised five children. He has delivered 4,000 babies during his medical career, while routinely providing free care to poor patients and refusing to accept Medicare or Medicaid payments. He has also refused to accept a government pension, seeing it as immoral and hypocritical. He could have spent his life running his medical practice, playing by government mandated rules, and becoming a multi-millionaire. Instead he chose to embark on an uncertain journey into the sea of Washington politics.

He decided to begin his struggle against tyranny, big government and currency debasement by the Federal Reserve on August 15, 1971. While still a medical resident during the 1960s, Paul was influenced by Friedrich Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, which led him to read many publications by Ludwig von Mises. He became acquainted with economists Hans Sennholz and Murray Rothbard, and credits them with his interest in the study of economics. He came to believe what the Austrian school economists wrote was confirmed when President Richard Nixon “closed the gold window” by implementing the U.S. dollar’s complete departure from the gold standard. On that day, the young physician decided to enter the rough treacherous seas of politics, saying later, “After that day, all money would be political money rather than money of real value.”

Winning and losing are not what is important in life, as we all will lose out to death in the end. It is the honor gained during the struggle that matters. It’s the legacy we leave for future generations. Did we fight the good fight, or did we sit idly by while life passed by? Did your life mean something to someone? You can stay safely on the shore or you can jump into your skiff and sail into the deep water and conquer your marlin. Both Santiago and the marlin display qualities of pride, honor, and courage, and both are subject to the same eternal law: they must kill or be killed. As Santiago reflects when he observes the weary warbler fly toward shore, where it will inescapably meet the hawk, the world is filled with marauders, and no living thing can escape the unavoidable struggle that will lead to its demise. Man and fish will struggle to the death, just as ravenous sharks will ravage an old man’s prize catch.

Ron Paul chose to join the struggle in 1976 when he was elected a Congressman from Texas for the first time. His years in Washington have been a never ending struggle against corruption, the military industrial complex, and the Federal Reserve currency manipulators. He has been a lone fisherman fighting for truth and liberty for over three decades. We are all pulled by our own individual marlins. Ron Paul has endured scorn and derision, much like Santiago endured from the other fishermen after going eighty four days without a catch. He has always stayed focused on the important issues that have led to the relentless decline of the American Empire: liberty versus security, freedom versus government control, and sound money versus persistent Federal Reserve created inflation. He has fought forces within his own party and in the opposition party. Despite fighting this battle alone for decades and being bloodied and battered, he has never given up the fight.

Hemingway’s novel suggests that it is possible to transcend natural law. The very inescapability of destruction creates the terms that allow an admirable man to rise above it. It is specifically through the endeavor to combat the inevitable that a man can prove himself. Indeed, a man can prove this resolve over and over through the worthiness of the adversary he chooses to fight. Santiago, though devastated at the end of the novel, is never defeated. Instead, he emerges as a dignified conqueror. Santiago’s struggle does not enable him to change man’s position in the world. Rather, it enables him to meet his most noble destiny.

After toiling fruitlessly for decades in the corrupt halls of Congress, surrounded by sharks, scorned by the corporate mainstream media pundits, and ignored by a public that has chosen security and delusions of credit based wealth over freedom and personal responsibility, Ron Paul chose to take on his greatest challenge – seeking the Presidency of the United States. The odds were overwhelmingly against him in 2008 and they are again in 2012. He is 76 years old and has every right to be sitting on his porch in Lake Jackson, Texas enjoying the twilight years of his life. He is driven by his sense of duty to future generations of our once great country. Even though deep in his heart he knows this struggle will end in defeat, he endures. He will continue to spread his message of liberty, freedom, sound money and an optimism that has attracted millions of young people to his worldview. Like Santiago, Ron Paul is determined to show “what a man can do and what a man endures.”  

Pride as the Source of Greatness & Determination

“His choice had been to stay in the deep dark water far out beyond all snares and traps and treacheries. My choice was to go there to find him beyond all people. Beyond all people in the world. Now we are joined together and have been since noon. And no one to help either one of us.”Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea 

  

“The original American patriots were those individuals brave enough to resist with force the oppressive power of King George. I accept the definition of patriotism as that effort to resist oppressive state power. The true patriot is motivated by a sense of responsibility and out of self-interest for himself, his family, and the future of his country” – Ron Paul

The reason Santiago ventured into the deep waters of the Gulf, far past where a lesser fisherman would dare endeavor, was pride. It wasn’t the false pride of vanity, but the pride described by St. Augustine as “the love of one’s own excellence”. It was a virtuous pride revealing his greatness of soul and faith in his own abilities. Santiago’s pride ended up being his tragic flaw. He went out beyond the boundaries of a normal fisherman. In the end he was ruined, along with his prize, by the malevolent sharks. His run of bad luck was an affront to his pride and drove him to go beyond his limits.

Hemingway does not denounce Santiago for being full of pride. On the contrary, Santiago stands as testimony that pride inspires men to greatness. Because the old man concedes that he killed the mighty marlin largely out of pride, and because his capture of the marlin leads in turn to his heroic transcendence of defeat, pride becomes the source of Santiago’s greatest strength. Without a fierce sense of pride, that battle would never have been fought, or would have been forsaken before the end.

Ron Paul has a clear vision of the America our forefathers imagined. It is a vision of a people free from government control of every aspect of their lives. It’s a vision where the people keep what they earn and don’t pay half to government to be redistributed based upon a politician’s re-election aspirations. It’s a vision where the people are free to make their own choices and free to succeed or fail based on their own merits. It’s a vision where a truly free market exists and private bankers do not control and manipulate the currency. It’s a vision that calls for a strong national defense, not being the policeman to the world. It’s a vision where we follow the U.S. Constitution and the rule of law. It’s a vision where a limited government ensures the liberties and freedoms of the population. It’s a vision that calls for balanced budgets, sound money, and citizens and corporations accepting the consequences of their actions. If Santiago was a fisherman in the U.S. today, he would be required to have a license to fish, a permit for his boat, pay taxes on his catch, and probably have to release the marlin because it was endangered. Some government thug would have met Santiago at the dock and written him a ticket for being at sea too long and illegal feeding of sharks.

Is Ron Paul running for President because he desires power, control and glory? Anyone who has ever seen Ron Paul or heard him speak knows he is decent man desperately trying to convey his message:

“The most basic principle to being a free American is the notion that we as individuals are responsible for our own lives and decisions. We do not have the right to rob our neighbors to make up for our mistakes, neither does our neighbor have any right to tell us how to live, so long as we aren’t infringing on their rights. Freedom to make bad decisions is inherent in the freedom to make good ones. If we are only free to make good decisions, we are not really free.” 

It is Ron Paul’s pride and unswerving belief in his message of freedom that inspires him to forge ahead in this grueling voyage destined to fail in the eyes of the media and political sharks that circle him, attacking at every opportunity. What these superficial toadies will never understand is that winning isn’t what is important to Ron Paul. It’s the message and the truth that matters. His pride enables him to endure. It is endurance that matters most in Hemingway’s conception of the world—a world in which death and destruction, as part of the natural order of things, are unavoidable. Hemingway seems to believe there are only two options: defeat or endurance until destruction; Santiago and Ron Paul have chosen the latter. Their stoic determination is mythic, nearly Christ-like in proportion.

Grace Under Pressure

“Every man’s life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another.”Ernest Hemingway

  

 

“Freedom is not defined by safety. Freedom is defined by the ability of citizens to live without government interference. Government cannot create a world without risks, nor would we really wish to live in such a fictional place. Only a totalitarian society would even claim absolute safety as a worthy ideal, because it would require total state control over its citizens’ lives. Liberty has meaning only if we still believe in it when terrible things happen and a false government security blanket beckons.” Ron Paul

Hemingway unquestionably likens Santiago to Christ throughout the novel. Like Christ, he is filled with goodness, patience, and humility. The forces of evil, however, are arrayed against Santiago, as seen when he fends off the sharks. Similarly, Christ had to clash with the wicked Pharisees in Jerusalem. Both men’s struggles end with shame and humiliation. Christ is betrayed, beaten, forced to carry his own cross, and is crucified, with arms outstretched and bleeding hands nailed to the cross. Santiago is betrayed by the sharks and his spirit crushed. Arriving home a disconsolate man, he struggles up the hill with his mast across his back, much like Christ bearing the cross up to Calvary. When he finally lies down in his bed, his arms are stretched straight out with palms up, and his hands are bleeding. It is an obvious reflection of Christ on the cross.

Having read hundreds of articles by Ron Paul and watched an equal number of interviews he has given over the last five years, his goodness, patience and humility shine through in every instance, along with his knowledge, diligence and charitable nature. The ideologues on the left wing and the right wing that dominate the dialogue in the mainstream media despise Dr. Paul and his message. They attempt to denigrate and humiliate him through their propaganda machines by twisting his words and misrepresenting his positions. They fear his message of individual responsibility and peaceful interaction with all nations. Those in power want to control our lives and force American values upon other nations. If Dr. Paul’s ideas were to take root with the American people, the era of corporate fascist big government would be over. The welfare – warfare state would begin to wither away. Dr. Paul, much like Santiago and Christ, never lashes out at the forces of evil confronting him along his journey. He is stoic and resolute as he spreads his message of truth, liberty and hope.     

Santiago’s favorite baseball player was Joe DiMaggio. The Yankee Clipper was the greatest ballplayer of his era. His 56 game hitting streak has never been surpassed. He led his team to nine World Series victories in his thirteen seasons. He played much of his career with painful bone spurs in his heel. His father was a fisherman, as were generations before him. DiMaggio inspired Santiago with his leadership qualities and the determination to win, in spite of handicaps. The image of the baseball hero playing in pain gave Santiago renewed vigor and stamina to bear his own pain. Joe DiMaggio was later used by Simon & Garfunkel as a symbol of an America longing for its past glory:

Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio,
Our nation turns its lonely eyes to you.
What’s that you say, Mrs. Robinson.
Jolting Joe has left and gone away,
Hey hey hey.

Mrs. Robinson

Joe DiMaggio was a symbol of excellence, perseverance, determination and leadership. He overcame adversity and triumphed despite his constant pain. Ron Paul has persevered through decades of obscurity and adversity. But, now his time has come. He is the intellectual godfather of the Tea Party movement. The neo-conservative element of the Republican Party has attempted to hijack the true Tea Party message of limited government, individual liberty, non-interventionism in foreign lands, freedom to live our lives without a smothering government bureaucracy dictating mandates at every turn, and a sound currency not controlled by a private banking cabal. As our country spirals downward due to the complete hijacking of our political system by the moneyed interests on Wall Street and the military industrial complex, leading us into never ending wars, Ron Paul’s message is finally striking a chord, especially among the young people who will be saddled with the crushing debt created by those in power. Despite the blatant lies and attempts to discredit and ignore him, Ron Paul charges forward with perseverance and courage unheard of in a man his age. He doesn’t do it for the glory, but for the unborn future generations who have no voice in their future.

Santiago dreams of lions throughout the novel first as cubs playing on the beach and ultimately as noble warriors, signifying great strength and a sense of renewal and vitality. They inspire confidence and optimism about the future. The old will give way to the young. The aged majestic warrior, through his example of bravery, courage and persistence, leaves the young warriors with a shining example of living life to its utmost and sacrificing personal glory for the good of the many. Ron Paul may not win the Presidency, but the example he has set for the young people of this country has laid the groundwork for a better tomorrow. His message of liberty, freedom and responsibility will resonate far after he has left this earth.

All of the symbols employed by Hemingway add to premise that life is an endless struggle with illusory rewards. In order to achieve nobility in life, a person must exhibit bravery, poise, courage, patience, optimism, and intelligence during the struggle. Then, even if the prize is lost, the person has won the battle, proving himself capable of retaining grace under pressure, the ultimate test of mankind. Ron Paul’s life is a shining example of grace under pressure. He has single handedly battled his great fish (Big Government, Big Finance, Big Military) for four decades with no helpers and many detractors. His journey is nearing its end. But it isn’t how it ends that matters. The journey is what separates the noble lion (Ron Paul) from the hyenas (corrupt politicians) and jackals (media). Ron’s message will not die. His son will carry the torch. The young people who have been inspired by his words and example will carry the torch. All of our lives will end the same way. The lesson to be learned from Ron Paul is how we should live our lives.

The ideologically myopic pundits that pass for the intelligentsia in the mainstream media scornfully declare that Ron Paul has no chance of winning, when all critical thinking citizens recognize that he has already won. They can destroy him, but he will not be defeated.

“Up the road, in his shack, the old man was sleeping again. He was still sleeping on his face and the boy was sitting by him watching him. The old man was dreaming about the lions.”  - Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea 

   

“Ideas are very important to the shaping of society. In fact, they are more powerful than bombings or armies or guns. And this is because ideas are capable of spreading without limit. They are behind all the choices we make. They can transform the world in a way that governments and armies cannot. Fighting for liberty with ideas makes more sense to me than fighting with guns or politics or political power. With ideas, we can make real change that lasts.” Ron Paul

 



192 Comments
  1. Administrator says:

    “That government is best which governs the least, because its people discipline themselves.”

    Thomas Jefferson

    “Liberty is lost through complacency and a subservient mindset. When we accept or even welcome automobile checkpoints, random searches, mandatory identification cards, and paramilitary police in our streets, we have lost a vital part of our American heritage. America was born of protest, revolution, and mistrust of government. Subservient societies neither maintain nor deserve freedom for long.”

    Ron Paul

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    11th March 2012 at 8:52 am

  2. The Old Man And The Sea – 2011 « InvestmentWatch – The best source of news, analysis, and intelligent discussion says:

    [...] by Jim Quinn of The Burning Platform [...]

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    11th March 2012 at 8:53 am

  3. scott says:

    Eloquent piece but as another gifted writer noted:

    “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.”

    We don’t need leaders to beat back the forces of tyranny if we would just live under the Constitution our founders bequethed to us. Its a very complete document on how to govern a free society and keep at bay those who would ‘do good’ or ‘evil’. Alas, humans are easy prey to the siren song of greed and envy and elect buffoons, predators and scoundrels who lead the public into ruin.

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    11th March 2012 at 9:04 am

  4. newsjunkie says:

    0ee064ae-e954-4c02-a52e-72c95bc142a5.jpg

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    11th March 2012 at 9:22 am

  5. TeresaE says:

    What an impressive piece to start my week.

    Thank you.

    This struck me, “…citizens and corporations accepting the consequences of their actions..”

    We seem a long, long, way from that happening. Most don’t even want it to happen.

    From our public schools, to our boardrooms, “not my fault, not my job” has become the motto.

    Parents are flooding doctor’s offices to get their children labeled, then declared eligible for government benefits and the bonus of turning parenting skills into only having to drug the little bastards until they go to bed.

    We seem to have gone from a country that believed hard work, personal investment and dedication equated to a better standard a living and life to a country that believes you get ahead by either winning the lottery, signing up for disability or suing our own jobs out of the country because we are too stupid to inherently realize coffee and tea needs to be brewed at “dangerous” temperatures. Dr. Paul was from a generation that NEVER would have sued a business, or neighbor, for their own stupidity, he knew he needed to work his ass off for to advance his career, he knew that paying your obligations and being a man of your word was the grease that kept society together. I doubt we have ever been further from that world than we are now.

    In asking our government to hold and protect and make everything “fair”, we have managed to create a society that 100% caters to victims, so we victimize ourselves, our children and everyone else by doing half a job, accepting filth (have your really looked at fast food joints recently? sometime between my stint in one in the 80s and today, filth has become acceptable) and firmly believing that perception is more important than reality.

    Again I am awed by your prose and your ability to make connections.

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    11th March 2012 at 9:40 am

  6. eugend66 says:

    Ummm … , what newsjunkie said !

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    11th March 2012 at 9:48 am

  7. Maddie's Mom says:

    Parents are flooding doctor’s offices to get their children labeled, then declared eligible for government benefits and the bonus of turning parenting skills into only having to drug the little bastards until they go to bed. – TeresaE

    This^^^^^makes me sick to my stomach.

    filth has become acceptable) – TeresaE

    It seems so. I try very hard to avoid fast-food places and public restrooms. Alas, yesterday I found myself in both. I hope it’s a very long time before it happens again. It’s hard to enjoy a meal when you’re wondering as you eat if you will end up sick from the food or exposure to the filth. Blecchh!!

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    11th March 2012 at 10:17 am

  8. buchjoe says:

    Nice work there Jim. Maybe your best yet.

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    11th March 2012 at 10:26 am

  9. pcaldallas says:

    Government is forced dependence. The longer a system is in place the harder it becomes to separate from the new normal. People today cannot envision a society without social security, medicare, welfare, the department of education, health and human services and on and on. These are necessary programs on which people depend. The fact that the bulk of the federal bureaucracy is a 20th century creation is glossed over and ignored. The country thrived prior to the implementation of these programs. The same can also be said for our enormous and bloated military. Does providing for our common defense mean we must have troops stationed around the world? What good does a fighting force serve when there is no war to fight other than stand in provocation and encourage a conflict? The global corporations and international banks are the ultimate puppet masters controlling the elected representatives in D.C.

    The welfare and entitlement programs have succeeded in cowing the people of Amerika into acceptance that there is no alternative to government provision. The majority opinion is that these programs are necessary and are in need of an overhaul but should by no means be discontinued. The media conglomerates have also for decades drilled into the minds of Amerikans that there is a threat behind every rock and tree and that only a military with a global reach and presence can keep the people safe. The older generations lived under the assumed threat of the “evil empire” which was largely a creation of the western banking interests. Our supposed enemy wanted to nuke us back to the stone age yet we provided food and grain to them without which they could not have survived. Like a rigged boxing match where one fighter carries the other for a few rounds so the fixer can win his bet, so too has Amerika endeavored as such with its “enemies.” We now face the “war on terrrorism” which by its very nature implies a war with no end against an enemy who could be anyone and anywhere. It is fear that compels dependence and the powers that be will stoke that fear to higher heights to tighten their grip on the populace.

    Make no mistake, the drive of government from here on out will be to further dependence on the system for the greater benefit of the international banks and corporations. A policy of individualism, independence and liberty is dangerous from the globalists’ perspective and these are the ideas they wish to see destroyed. History has proven that the terrible and destructive lengths to which these people will go to further their power and control know no bounds. The situation will get much worse before it gets better.

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    11th March 2012 at 10:36 am

  10. Steve Hogan says:

    Hemingway’s old man and Ron Paul makes for an apt comparison. People can mock them, but they will always have their dignity and honor.

    Paul will likely fail in his attempt for the presidency, but no one can say that he didn’t carry himself as a gentleman and statesman, uttering truths that need to be told. It is a sad commentary on the state of American politics that more people don’t recognize his qualities.

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    11th March 2012 at 10:38 am

  11. SteveMT says:

    “Hemingway seems to believe there are only two options: defeat or endurance until destruction; Santiago and Ron Paul have chosen the latter.”

    There is a third option that you should all consider when reading this great story, but that would mean rewriting the last part of the story. Santiago defeats all of the sharks as Ron Paul has done in the past and is still doing currently. He enters the harbor with his prize marlin unscathed, and Santiago is victorious against the forces of evil.

    The third option is Ron Paul wins the presidency. Victory is also an option. If Ron Paul didn’t believe that he can win, he would not be running, and I would not be wasting my time supporting someone who conveyed a defeatist message. With the record that Ron Paul has, he can win, but he needs help the same way that Santiago needed help. Santiago tried to catch the marlin and bring it home single-handedly. Ron Paul is not alone. Believe it, and start making it happen.

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    11th March 2012 at 10:43 am

  12. ssgconway says:

    Admin, you’ve been eloquent and polemical in the past, but you wax poetic here. This is as good as anything you’ve done, the more so for the inner quality of reflectiveness, and for your insights into the only major champion of liberty in national politics today. Thank you.
    P.S. You bring to mind Kipling’s “If,” one of my favorite poems, which treats of the same subject – manhood and courage in the face of defeat, disaster and despair.

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    11th March 2012 at 10:45 am

  13. Administrator says:

    SherfJ201109071.jpg

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    11th March 2012 at 10:48 am

  14. Smokey says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

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    11th March 2012 at 10:54 am

  15. ssgconway says:

    One of my daughters is reading ‘On Wings of eagles,” the Ken Follett book about Ross Perot and the Iran hostage rescue of his EDS employees that he engineered. She’s 14 and does not remember him. I let her know about his campaigns in ’92 and ’96 and how he was the last major third-party challenger to the establishment.
    Remember “That giant sucking sound” and his warnings on the budget? We could use him today. I wonder how he views Ron Paul’s candidacy?

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    11th March 2012 at 10:56 am

  16. matt says:

    I wish the election for POTUS was today, I am so ready for this b.s. to end. Ron Paul wins the CA. straw poll last week, Bachmann is already fading, Perry’s luster will soon wear off. It’s between Paul and Romney so let’s just do it now. BTW, who would accept a Romney/Paul or Paul/Romney ticket?

    Great article Jim!

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:00 am

  17. VinnieTheShark says:

    As I read this, I couldn’t help but think of my favorite TR quote.

    “It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.”

    A man who has been around as long as Dr. Paul certainly understands that while the end may not be what he most wants, his life’s struggle undoubtedly inspires those around him to take a closer look at what he has to say.

    Matthew 13:57 reads, “And they were offended in him. But Jesus said unto them, A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house.”

    At this point in time, the majority of the American people do not understand RP enough to give him the credit he deserves for his thoughts and tireless efforts in the arena. To them, he is without honor. I hope over the next few years this will change.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 18 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:04 am

  18. George says:

    “The ending will be the same for everyone who walks this earth. ”

    Maybe it was this sense of the inevitable futility of life that led Hemingway to commit suicide, that in the end there is nothing. Maybe a vast swath of America also has this nihilistic belief. IF that’s true then it is logical that these Americans would use any means available to have a better life on this earth with their damn-my-neighbor, it’s-all-about-me attitude.

    Solzhenitsyn rhetorically asked and then answered : “Why have men become like animals? Because they have forgotten God.”

    Maybe America is headed for the “Animal Farm.”

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 4

    11th March 2012 at 12:01 pm

  19. Colma Rising says:

    I want to know why Hemmingway cracked…
    (official video so get passed the ad…)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-s5pP2aTiY&ob=av2e

    a febrile shocking violent smack
    the children are hoping for a heart attack,
    tonight the windows are watching,
    the streets all conspire,
    and the lamppost can’t stop crying,
    if I could fly high above the world,
    would I see a bunch of living dots spell the world stupidity?,
    or would I see hungry lover homicides,
    loving brother suicides,
    and olly olly oxenfrees,
    who pickaside and hide

    the world is scratching at my door,
    my morning papers got the scores,
    the human interest stories, and the obituary

    cockroach naps and rattling traps,
    how many devils can you fit upon a match head?,
    caringosity killed the Kerouac cat,
    sometimes truth is stranger than fiction

    in my alley around the corner,
    there’s a wino with feathered shoulders,
    and a spirit giving head for crack and he’ll never want it back,
    there’s a little kid and his family eating crackers like thanksgiving
    and a pack of wild desperados scornful of living

    the worlds is scratching at my door….

    cradle for a cat, Wolfe looks back,
    how many angels can you fit upon a match?
    I want to know why Hemingway cracked,
    sometimes truth is stranger than fiction

    life is the crummiest book I ever read,
    there isn’t a hook, just a lot of cheap shots,
    pictures to shock and characters an amateur would never dream up

    -Bad Religion
    “Stranger Than Fiction”

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 12:35 pm

  20. SSS says:

    Sweet. Top to bottom, this article is as good as you’ve ever written, Jim.

    And you’ve managed to slip in a line or two, or ten, of biting criticism of the federal government. Best one: “Some government thug would have met Santiago at the dock and written him a ticket for being at sea too long and illegal feeding of sharks.”

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 27 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 12:42 pm

  21. Baseball 13 says:

    Great Article. Broad publication of this may bring an epiphany. Permission to reprint, crediting the author?

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 15 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 12:53 pm

  22. Administrator says:

    Here is some insight into his suicide.

    Hemingway suffered from physical problems as well: his health declined and his eyesight was failing. In November he was admitted to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, where he may have believed he was to be treated for hypertension.Meyers writes that “an aura of secrecy surrounds Hemingway’s treatment at the Mayo”, but confirms that in December 1960 he received electroconvulsive therapy as many as 15 times, then in January 1961 he was “released in ruins”.

    Three months later, back in Ketchum, Mary found Hemingway holding a shotgun one morning. She called Dr. Saviers, who sedated him and had him admitted to the Sun Valley Hospital; from there he was returned to the Mayo for more shock treatments. While Hemingway consented to the additional treatments, he was bitter about their apparent effect on his memory and writing. As he put it,

    “What these shock doctors don’t know is about writers…and what they do to them…What is the sense of ruining my head and erasing my memory, which is my capital, and putting me out of business? It was a brilliant cure but we lost the patient.”

    He was released in late June and arrived home in Ketchum on June 30. Two days later, in the early morning hours of July 2, 1961, Hemingway “quite deliberately” shot himself with his favorite shotgun. He unlocked the gun cabinet, went to the front entrance of their Ketchum home, and “pushed two shells into the twelve-gauge Boss shotgun, put the end of the barrel into his mouth, pulled the trigger and blew out his brains.”

    During his final years, Hemingway’s behavior was similar to his father’s before he himself committed suicide; his father may have had the genetic disease hemochromatosis, in which the inability to metabolize iron culminates in mental and physical deterioration. Medical records made available in 1991 confirm that Hemingway’s hemochromatosis had been diagnosed in early 1961. His sister Ursula and his brother Leicester also committed suicide. Added to Hemingway’s physical ailments was the additional problem that he had been a heavy drinker for most of his life.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 12:54 pm

  23. constman says:

    Really, really, really enjoyed the read. Life is spiritual. I happen to be a Christian and believe what I believe with strong convictions. But “Free Will” puts a twist on life that gives these words there real meaning; “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness”. You see 52 of the 56 signers of the Declaration were confessing Christians and ALL 56 were “Spiritual” men. These men decided that there was something greater in life worth living for and in many, many cases worth dying for.

    A truly free man is free to choose to both good and evil. Without freewill there cannot be love or charity. A man must get up every day look in mirror and choose to do the right thing in spite of who he is. He gets up looks at himself realizes his shortcomings and faults and says in spite of it I will choose today to do good. In the good ole King James Bible the word used for love is charity. Will I choose today to show charity (love)? I will no longer use the word love because the word charity is much deeper and has lost its meaning today.

    Charity is about personal responsibility. Charity is a spiritual word. Charity demands a response from the individual, not the government. It demands that the individual of his own Free Will choose to do the right thing. I was driving to a college football game with my son in my 2011 gas guzzler to go sit in my seats and watch 4 hours of football and be entertained. On the way there was a man making his way across the street with no legs. His pants were duct-taped at the bottom and he used two blocks with handles to make his way. I looked at him at first in pity, but with no sense of responsibility. You see it is the governments responsibility to take care of him (that was my thought). I pay taxes and they pay to take care of him it is not my responsibility.

    I then asked my son what he thought and he felt no responsibility either. That prompted me to ask then what is charity? Why don’t I feel any responsibility to help (& you)? And what is charity for this man? Is charity buying him food? Is charity finding out what skill he has or can learn and teaching him how to feed himself? Is charity providing employment for him? Then our discussion went to all the government rules and regulations that might possibly get in the way of helping this man and that it probably wouldn’t be worth it, so we leave charity to the government. But the government is incapable of providing charity. Charity in its purist form can only come from the individual. Charity is not about money charity is selfless, charity does not seek its own, charity puts other before itself, charity is patient, kind, gentle……. These are characteristics that only individuals (Free Men) can personify. The government is completely incapable of Charity.

    The men who signed the declaration were charitable men. They gave up there lives so we could have a free life. So that as Free Men we could choose to be charitable as well. They died so we could get up every day look in the mirror and see ourselves in all our fallen glory and yet choose to do the right thing. Choose to be a Man today and choose to fight for the next generation, choose to put on Charity.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 24 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 12:56 pm

  24. Administrator says:

    Baseball 13

    Spread the message as far and as wide as possible.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 14 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 12:58 pm

  25. Administrator says:

    SSS

    I liked that line too. I wasn’t sure how to work it into the story, but I think it worked.

    I’m going to try and create a 900 or so word version of this article and ask all the TBPers to send it to their local newspapers as an Op-Ed. Most papers won’t print an Op-Ed over 900 words.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 1:01 pm

  26. Colma Rising says:

    Admin: Do just that. I’ll send it, even if I normally wouldn’t. Also thanks for the summary of the suicide.

    A powerful piece. It flies in the face of the “whoever dies with the most toys” bullshit that many Libertarian-oriented folks have.

    Depression is natural. Tough shit. What does the uneasiness any thinking artist expresses point to? Darkness and hopelessness or the ideal qualities that the peculiar, sentient Animal called Humanity so concocts from the ability to transcend?

    Really, a brilliant work.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 1:18 pm

  27. Colma Rising says:

    dimaggio.jpg

    One of my neighbors. Quiet, no trouble… his guests get rowdy every now and again but they’re good folks.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 1:39 pm

  28. AWD says:

    Great work. One of my favorite books. A hard-back copy was given to me when I was young by our neighbors, who had survived the Nazi holocaust.

    Hemingway’s stuff is good and timeless because it addresses good versus evil. The constant struggle of good versus evil. The never ending battle. Most people can’t or won’t rise above their human nature, which is animalistic, cruel, sinful, ugly and tragic.

    There is so much ugliness and evil in the world it’s mind boggling. It seems insurmountable, and it is by human means. But there is something else at work, thank you GOD. We all play our part, not knowing what the ultimate purpose is going to be, but there is a purpose, and that is enough.

    Hemingway was no angel. He was a terrible womanizer and a drunk. Self-medication for depression? I suppose so. Many of the great artists had depression problems. Some depression is anger turned inwards. Who can help but get angry at what is happening all the time? It doesn’t matter which era it is, there are always lesser, evil men trying to impose their will on everyone. If you’re angry all the time, you will then be depressed also.

    It is only when more people decide that good is better than evil that things change. Most of the time evil wins out. Then evil has to run it’s course and be defeated, once again.

    As so eloquently stated in your writing, it is how we comport ourselves that matters in the end. We can take nothing with us when we die except what we have learned on earth and the good we have done. Therefore, earthly possessions don’t really matter in the end. It’s not having the fish that matters, it’s what catching the fish taught us that matters. We have free will, and can decide to be ugly, evil and useless, or the contrary. It’s not very hard to figure out on which side of the equation most people line up. Anyway, well done.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 15 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 1:57 pm

  29. Administrator says:

    NEO-CON SHARKS OUT TO GET RON PAUL

    Interventionists Ready a Media Lynching for Ron Paul
    by Michael Scheuer

    The past ten days have seen a spate of pieces on Google News damning Congressman Ron Paul for “blaming” America for the 9/11 attacks. This is just the start of what will become a wave of ever-more shrill and lie-filled attacks on Mr. Paul as long as he is seeking the Republican presidential nomination and continues to find growing public support. The attacks on Mr. Paul are and will be the work of the Neoconservatives, the Israel-First fifth column of U.S. citizens, and AIPAC and those it controls in the Congress, media, and academy.

    Mr. Paul, of course, never blamed the United States for the war the Islamists started and are now waging on the United States. What he did say is merely what is true beyond any credible challenge: Our growing number of Islamist enemies are motivated to attack us because of what the U.S. government does in the Muslim world and not because of how Americans live and think here at home. Mr. Paul bravely and clearly delivers this essential message to U.S. voters, and as long as he tells this truth he will receive the venom and slander of the above mentioned people and organizations.

    And worse is yet to come. On 1 and 2 September 2011, Commentary Magazine – long Israel-First’s flagship publication – identified Mr. Paul’s truth-telling in regard to the impact of U.S. foreign policy in the Islamic world as a “bizarre and twisted interpretation of events” and described him and his supporters as taking Osama bin Laden’s statements as their bible. Commentary went on to damn Mr. Paul and his supporters as follows:

    “[Congressman] Paul seems intent on blaming America for the burning [Islamist] hatred directed against us, to the point that he has to disfigure history to justify it. It’s a peculiar citizen who would do such a thing. I suppose I understand why most Republicans (with the fine exception of Rick Santorum) have not taken on the noxious ideology of Representative Paul. But the dirty little secret is Ron Paul holds views that are disgraceful. It seems to me that conservatives, in the name of reaching out to those who inhabit the loony fringes of the libertarian movement, shouldn’t pretend otherwise.”

    If this sounds familiar it is because it is precisely the kind of attack that was used against the America First organization when it sought to prevent America from entering the European War that began in September, 1939. Interventionists in both parties; much of the media; senior members of the Roosevelt Administration; leaders of Britain’s pro-intervention covert action program in the United States; and spokesmen for Jewish-American organizations all slandered America First members as disloyal citizens who were ignorant of the world. Together these entities misidentified distinguished Americans who were using 1st Amendment rights to defend what they saw as U.S. interests as traitors, madmen, Nazi sympathizers, and anti-Semites. In their words this week, the articles in Commentary and elsewhere have identified Dr. Paul and the millions who agree with him as “peculiar” citizens (traitors?); madmen (“loony fringes”); and bin Laden sympathizers.

    If Mr. Paul continues telling the truth and his support keeps growing, Israel-First’s next step will be to begin smearing him as an anti-Semite, just as Charles Lindbergh and other America First leaders were falsely identified in the late 1930s by the sorts of people noted above. And such attacks on Mr. Paul probably will be more vicious than those on Lindbergh, et al. Some of those who opposed America First, for example, conducted a sharp but fair-minded debate over a clearly substantive and legitimate question: “Does Nazi Germany pose a threat to genuine U.S. national interests?”

    Today, however, Mr. Paul’s attackers know they have no legitimate, defensible issue on their side of the debate, only their malevolent desire to see America fight all of Islam on Israel‘s behalf. Indeed, they know the United States and its interests are in large measure threatened and attacked by Islamists because of the U.S. government’s relentless and unquestioning intervention on Israel’s behalf. Thus, the combination of the fact that Mr. Paul’s words are gaining traction with some Americans, and that the Israel-First position is built on sand – that is, it is clear no U.S. interest is served by the current U.S.-Israel relationship – means that Mr. Paul’s attackers use any and every kind of slander to defame him and to ensure the United States will fight to protect Israel against the rising and uncontrollable tide of anti-Israel sentiment that is being produced by the so-called Arab Spring.

    In this vein, Commentary’s description of Mr. Paul’s “noxious ideology” is a first step that probably will lead to a systematic Israel-First effort to identify Mr. Paul and those who support him as anti-Semites simply because they do not want to see America’s soldier-children die fighting in an irrelevant Israel-Muslim religious war in which no genuine U.S. interests are at risk.

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    11th March 2012 at 2:46 pm

  30. Apollo says:

    I watched this novel made into a movie in a cinema, starring Spencer Tracy, when I was a mere young teen.

    It burned a psyche so deep into my innocent being that it, sub-conscientiously, formed a foundation of my adult life. It made me grow up beyond me age at that time.

    Note to Gen X and Gen Y: Learn from the folks who survive the Depression, and won the War, such as Tracy. Only then will you either survive the outcome of the Fourth Turning.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 2:54 pm

  31. Daniel says:

    Great post – well written and intensely true!

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:08 pm

  32. Administrator says:

    “Adversity is a severe instructor, set over us by one who knows us better than we do ourselves, as he loves us better too. He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. This conflict with difficulty makes us acquainted with our object, and compels us to consider it in all its relations. It will not suffer us to be superficial.”

    Edmund Burke

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:51 pm

  33. PeterH says:

    A super article… loved it.

    The concept of “grace under pressure” is 100% confirmation of the spritual nature of our existance. Once you realize that we are “here on Earth” for a purpose, then the person who exibits “grace under pressure” is simply not worried if they will survive or perish, they are performing their calling, with passion. It is so simple, and explains everything.

    Remember, we are “in this world, but not “of” it”. We are in spiritual entities having an occasional existence in the material plane, and we are not physical entities having an occasional spiritual experience (Edgar Cayce, Deepak Chopra, The Bible).

    Wonderful article, thank you very much.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 4:40 pm

  34. Nomad says:

    This piece made my morning, and I will enjoy revisiting it during the coming days. Keep up the exceptionally good work. Often you are the one reasoned voice I can rely on in this mass media wilderness.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 5:34 pm

  35. ron says:

    I like Ron Paul but his campaign is ran so horribly,i wonder if he can win.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 5:42 pm

  36. Welshman says:

    Admin.,

    I didn’t receive this until later today? It was absolutely one of your best Jim. Intergrating “Old Man and the Sea” and Ron Paul was a delightful thoughtful article. I read the book and saw the movie when I was young. Spencer Tracy was very special in that movie.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:08 pm

  37. Dave Doe says:

    Awesome article Jim.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:36 pm

  38. Steve says:

    I think it’s why Ron is so well loved.Like a big brother who was fighting for you before you realised you were in a fight.Fighting all the power of a corrupt government alone for endless years just because it is right.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 16 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:38 pm

  39. John Coster says:

    What a beautiful article. Thanks so much. I’ve just been watching hundreds of young people marching on Wall Street, seen the police lines forming.> http://www.livestream.com/globalrevolution>
    Are these kids naive? I think not, and if so, who cares? They’re not at the frat house drinking beer. They are earnestly trying to change things, struggling to find an equitable process by which to create a movement. They know just how bad things are getting and they know who to blame. That’s a good start. If enough of them came to understand Ron Paul…well who knows what could happen? Frankly I am moved by their efforts. And by this article. Nice to see classic literature put to good use

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:47 pm

  40. Gitano says:

    Hemingway was an expat because he saw the same things we do, but much earlier:

    In the winter of 1933-34, Ernest Hemingway and his wife went on a two month safari to East Africa. Afterward he wrote, “Green Hills of Africa”. Here are some excerpts.

    “Sure, you couldn’t make a living. Everyone had explained that. The locusts came and ate your crops and the monsoon failed, and the rains did not come, and everything dried up and died. There were ticks and fly to kill the stock, and mosquitoes gave you fever and maybe you got blackwater. Your cattle would die and you would get no price for your coffee. A white hunter worked for three months out of the year and drank for twelve and the Government was ruining the country for the benefit of the Hindu and the natives. That was what they told you. Sure. But I did not want to make money. All I wanted was to live in it and have time to hunt. Already I have had one of the diseases and had experienced the necessity of washing a three-inch bit of my large intestine with soap and water and tucking it back where it belonged an unnumbered amount of times a day. There were remedies which cured this and it was well worth going through for what I had seen and where I had been. I loved this country and I felt at home and where a man feels at home, outside of where he’s born, is where he’s meant to go. Then, in my grandfather’s time, Michigan was a malaria ridden state. They called it fever and ague. And in Tortugas, where I’d spent months, a thousand men once died of yellow fever. New continents and islands try to frighten you with disease as a snake hisses. The snake may be poisonous, too. You kill them off. Hell, what I had a month ago would have killed me in the old days before they invented the remedies. Maybe it would and maybe I would have gotten well.

    IT IS EASIER TO KEEP WELL IN A GOOD COUNTRY BY TAKING SIMPLE PRECAUTIONS THAN TO PRETEND THAT A COUNTRY THAT IS FINISHED IS STILL GOOD.

    A continent ages quickly once we come. The natives live in harmony with it. But the foreigner destroys it, cuts down the trees, drains the water, so that the water supply is altered and in short time the soil, once the sod is turned under, is cropped out and, next, it starts to blow away as it has blown away in every old country and as I had seen it start to blow in Canada.

    I would come back to Africa but not to make a living from it. I could do that with two pencils and a few hundred sheets of the cheapest paper. But I would come back to where it pleased me to live; to really live. Not just let my life pass. Our people went to America because it was the place to go then. It had been a good country and we had made a bloody mess of it and I would go, now, somewhere else as we had always had the right to go somewhere else and as we had always gone. You could always come back. Let others come to America who did not know that they had come too late. Our people had seen it at its best and fought for it when it was well worth fighting for. Now I would go somewhere else. We always went in the old days and there were still good places to go.”

    Ernest Hemingway, 1934

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:15 pm

  41. Joe Loyd says:

    I hear so often “I agree with almost everything Ron Paul says, but he can’t win.” THAT’S ONLY BECAUSE YOU, YES, I’M TALKING TO YOU, WON’T VOTE FOR HIM!!! What do you say we actually elect someone with integrity and a consistent message (which, by the way, matches his voting record exactly) and who will abide by the Constitution he has sworn to defend. Ron Paul in 2012!!

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 18 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 8:20 pm

  42. Colma Rising says:

    Gitano:

    Good shit. Thank you.

    Now go and cry in your pillow because there is no frontier.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:23 pm

  43. DavosSherman says:

    Awesome read!! Thanks!

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:26 pm

  44. Colma Rising says:

    Really, I’m not JUST being an ass… there reallly isn’t a frontier these days.

    Tough shit.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 8:28 pm

  45. llpoh says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

    Poorly-rated. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 18

    11th March 2012 at 8:33 pm

  46. Colma Rising says:

    Llpoh:

    Fuck it, just check the box by his name.

    It’s not like it’s that big a deal.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 15 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 8:36 pm

  47. llpoh says:

    Colma – “just being” an ass? That implies that there are times when you are not an ass. Not so, grasshopper. You properly should have said – “I am an ass”. But on you it looks good. Just try not to bite off more than you can chew:

    ass2.jpg

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 5 Thumb down 6

    11th March 2012 at 8:37 pm

  48. llpoh says:

    Colma – 1) he will not get the GOP nomination. 2) he will never win as an independent. I doubt there will be a box to check – write in is most likely possibility of him recieving votes. And i will not waste my time voting if it is a race between dumbfuck number 1 and dumbfuck number 2.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 8:39 pm

  49. Colma Rising says:

    I strive to be a complete ass.

    Better than half-ass, dammit.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:40 pm

  50. Appalachian Trail Deblazer says:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/ron-paul-can-win

    Another good article in support of Ron Paul.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:44 pm

  51. Stucky says:

    Awesome, awsome article.

    Fantastic comments. So much so I have nothing to add, except …

    2ab980f7-d925-4603-b66b-44ce0b1ffa7f.jpg

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 8:48 pm

  52. Stucky says:

    Top 10 statements that make me want to puke!

    1) Ron Paul can’t win.

    2 through 10) Ron Paul can’t win.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 8:49 pm

  53. Administrator says:

    LLPOH evidently didn’t read the article for comprehension.

    Did your Chinese competitor win a contract from you today?

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 3

    11th March 2012 at 8:50 pm

  54. Smokey says:

    For clarification, LLPOH did not reference the article.

    He referenced the stream of comments that followed it.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 5

    11th March 2012 at 8:53 pm

  55. Colma Rising says:

    Stuchenburger:

    You better like this article, shitbag.

    And you better move up to a LOT of pushups.

    Better if you do burpies!

    Hemmingway invokes questions that are better asked than glossed over.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:55 pm

  56. casamurphy says:

    Here in Texas I have voted Democratic all my life, but this year… for the first time in my life, I will vote in the Republican primary so that I can count myself as one of the people who have voted for Ron Paul.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 21 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 9:01 pm

  57. llpoh says:

    Smokey – right you are.

    Admin is just feeling a bit snitty because of all the chores he has in front of him.

    As I said, I like Ron Paul, for the most part. His inability to fight with the opposition during the debates is of concern to me, and I have questions about some of his positions. But he seems honest to me. Which is a huge plus. But the Paul fanatics are ignoring the baggage, just some of which I pointed out. While nothing is impossible, it is highly improbable that RP can climb the presidential mountain. When people like Obama and the Bushes get elected, it tells you everything you need to know about politics in America – quality and ability has nothing whatsoever to do with it. Nothing.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 5 Thumb down 5

    11th March 2012 at 9:04 pm

  58. llpoh says:

    Admin -BTW, I am peeling business back off my Chinese competitors. Fancy that. Service and quality still have their places in the sun, especially when combined with a niche market and high cost of transport.

    We are somewhat in the ballpark on cost, but are more expensive (say around 15% when all costs are considered). But no matter how cheap the product is, if it doesn’t arrive on time and doesn’t work when it arrive, customers will stop buying. So I have regained some lost work. It goes to show it can be done – but you have to pick your field carefully and be good at what you do. And we also never try to compete on price – we can’t do it, so we do not even try. I would rather go broke fast than suffer death by a thousand cuts.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 5 Thumb down 3

    11th March 2012 at 9:10 pm

  59. Smokey says:

    LLPOH,

    For the most part, it was another well written article by the Administrator. The comparisons of Paul to Hemingway were most appropriate within the context laid out in the article.

    I personally think the comparison of Ron Paul to Christ is a bit over the top, as is the picture immediately above Ron Paul.

    But in a PERFECT example of that to which you referred, this very comment will be mercilessly thumbed down because legions of Ron Paul supporters will be furious that I questioned the analogy of Ron Paul to Christ.

    LOL—–You reckon there’s any bias there?

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 8 Thumb down 10

    11th March 2012 at 9:22 pm

  60. llpoh says:

    Smokey – the fanaticism is growing old. It is one thing to push for the guy, but they denigrate any who point out the realities. And the realities are that the old codger is pushing shit up hill with a pointy stick. Sure – they can go out and vote for him in the primaries. I encourage it, and will likely do it myself. But, please, they need to be be realistic – the chances are extraordinarily slim that he will be elected.

    By the way – bookies currently have Obama the favorite to be re-elected. Bookies have an extraordinary strike rate in these things.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 3 Thumb down 5

    11th March 2012 at 9:32 pm

  61. AWD says:

    Admin sayz:

    “the mainstream media scornfully declare that Ron Paul has no chance of winning, when all critical thinking citizens recognize that he has already won. They can destroy him, but he will not be defeated”

    He has already won…..

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 9:40 pm

  62. Colma Rising says:

    Yur fuckin’ A right, A dub…

    Ron Paul won a long time ago.

    It ain’t about the top 20 Casey Cassum spiel.

    It really is about what the non-skeletons say.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:00 pm

  63. Apollo says:

    I have to support LLPOH – Ron Paul don’t stand a chance.

    He is an academic and he has no money. He is no executive. But he can act as adviser. He didn’t make a difference when he was much younger. His days have passed, and the era is passing him. He is the Old Man in the novel.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 1 Thumb down 15

    11th March 2012 at 10:17 pm

  64. LLPOH says:

    Now I am fucked.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 5 Thumb down 3

    11th March 2012 at 10:18 pm

  65. mdf says:

    This is as masterful and graceful a composition as I’ve had the pleasure to read. It is one of your best. Ron Paul’s lonely pursuit of Constitutional truthtelling fell on deaf ears until these recent crises made him seem like a prophet. God Bless his efforts (Presidential nomination or not) and God Bless you for all your efforts and your ennobling portrayal of Paul’s multi-decade struggle.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:24 pm

  66. Smokey says:

    LLPOH,

    I didn’t know there was a line on it yet, but their making Tarbaby the favorite does not surprise me. And I concur, the bookmakers have their shit together.

    Their having Tarbaby the favorite tells me that they know that the Republican field is extremely weak.

    Now, I’m going to piss off some more RP fanatics.

    These are my odds to take the White House in 2012. Not what I think the betting line will be, but instead what I believe the actual chances of each candidate winning the White House is:

    (1) Barack Obama 3-5

    (2)Hillary Clinton 7-5

    (3) Mitt Romney 20-1

    (4) Rick Perry 45-1

    (5) Michele Bachmann 340 – 1

    (6) Rudy Giuliani 400-1

    (7) Ron Paul 2.1 million to 1

    (8) Newt Gingrich 2.2 million to 1

    (9) Sarah Palin 4.5 million to 1

    (10) Herman Cain 286 million to 1

    (11) Al Huntsman 640 million to 1

    (12) Rick Santorum 311 billion to 1

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 3

    11th March 2012 at 10:27 pm

  67. Smokey says:

    Colma,

    Just for you—-Casey Kasem at his finest.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 10:31 pm

  68. llpoh says:

    The odds I saw was Obama 1.9 to GOP 2.2 or thereabouts – a British site. They do not give a shit who wins – they set the odds so that the wager ledgers balance, more or less. The odds therefore reflect a large number of people putting their money where there mouth is.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 10:33 pm

  69. llpoh says:

    “their mouth” – damn wordpress

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:34 pm

  70. Colma Rising says:

    Apollo:

    I give not a shit when I press the button and dump cheap Chinese goods in the drink. (Translate the ocean).

    Really. Not one iota of a shit…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:45 pm

  71. AWD says:

    I sometimes drop Chinese goods in the toilet twice a day, then flush.

    With Apollo on his side, lipoh can’t and won’t be beat. Odds on favorite…

    dumb-and-dumber.jpg

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:51 pm

  72. Colma Rising says:

    Cheap dim sum can really, really suck, A dubs.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:53 pm

  73. AWD says:

    Mr. Rising:

    Next time go for the Kung Pow Kitty. Made from fresh alley-cat. Ask for extra sauce.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 4

    11th March 2012 at 10:57 pm

  74. ed says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

    Poorly-rated. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 21

    11th March 2012 at 11:04 pm

  75. Colma Rising says:

    A-dub:

    Only the finest road-kill here…

    “Do we really wish to act upon our knowledge?”

    No. Flat-screens in the ocean are not flat-screens watched.

    Tough Shit.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 11:06 pm

  76. Colma Rising says:

    ed:

    What kind of motherfuckin horse-shit have you been fed?

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:07 pm

  77. Colma Rising says:

    I is channeling Crazy Ivan – any of youse able to ken a single word I have clicked out today, raise your digits.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:11 pm

  78. Smokey says:

    Colma,

    ed’s dumbass comment would probably bother you even if you weren’t three sheets in the wind.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:12 pm

  79. Colma Rising says:

    I have an idea!

    Why dont Colma Doppeganger enjoy a bath of single-celled soldiers?

    A shower of throat yogurt?

    Bitch.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:25 pm

  80. Colma Rising says:

    SPELLING CORRECTION!!!

    Biz-nach.

    I meant to writ6e Biz-nee-och.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:27 pm

  81. Colma Risadoppeller says:

    I think Colma was callin’ me a bitch, but with him it is hard to tell. Bwahahahaha!

    DunceCap_43426a.JPG

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:33 pm

  82. The Real Colma Rising says:

    CRY ME A FUCKING RIVER

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:36 pm

  83. Colma Risadoppeller says:

    dunce.jpg

    dunce.jpg

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:38 pm

  84. Colma Rising says:

    Okay…

    That first picture is fucking FREAKY.

    Who the fuck sat for THAT photo-op?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:42 pm

  85. Colma Risadoppeller says:

    text-message.gif

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:44 pm

  86. llpoh says:

    I am getting so old I need a fucking translator to understand what the hell Punk/Colma etc. say. And they are the next gen up from my kids. Time to put me out to pasture. I just hope it is with her:

    c3daf789-7ff4-4632-9783-a7d2b5414db1.jpg

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:48 pm

  87. AKAnon says:

    Got milk?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 1:13 am

  88. AKAnon says:

    Admin-outstanding piece. Really motivational, and thanks for keeping the language clean. I intend to send it to some relatives who aren’t into the motherfucking.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 1:15 am

  89. OF says:

    Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful. Thanks, Jim.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:57 am

  90. Novista says:

    I haven’t read comments yet, No matter. Coming late to the party as usual.

    JQ, your style is lyric, it reads like poetry from the heart. Even better, to find multiple metaphors which all impinge on the topic is remarkable. This essay touches me in various ways, not least because I had the opportunity to visit Hemingway’s house in Key West some years ago. Memories …

    So … thank you.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:50 am

  91. KYTT says:

    First time visitor. First time anywhere to publish a comment.

    That said;

    Wow! Prose, points and analogies, delivered with such pin-point precision. Moving indeed! Thus awakens that certain invigorating spirit in all humanity…Simply, the sweet smell of Liberty.

    Does make one ponder the quote attributed to Ghandi… “First they ignore you. Then they fight you.
    Then you win.

    Good site, good work!

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 7:25 am

  92. Novista says:

    Colma

    “I am not sure why Hemingway ‘cracked’ … ”

    but I can tell you, having outlived two wives that died of cancer (etc.) there comes a time for the best of us. I woke up one night, Marion is sitting on the edge of the bed, muttering “Can’t take more.” This is a woman who had the highest threshold of pain of anyone I ever saw.

    I held her and talked to her, and said, “It’s time to let go. I will wait for you.” Not sure she heard me but she lapsed into a deep sleep, breath slowing. Until the home nurse came and went troppo. If not for that busybody, she might have passed quietly away that morning. And she did a few nights later. In the local hospital, alone. I had contemplated giving her an oxycontin and scotch cocktail earlier.

    Maybe I should have.

    Or maybe I was cracking.

    And when your turn comes, someone else can ask why?

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 14 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:30 am

  93. Novista says:

    P.S. Colma

    I cannot view your link video “in my location” … for whatever that’s worth.

    And ‘passed’ should be — past!

    You dumb fuck!

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:36 am

  94. Administrator says:

    ed

    You’re a fucking dumbass motherfucker who listens to the propaganda spewed by the left. Try thinking for yourself you ignorant piece of shit.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 14 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 7:42 am

  95. Administrator says:

    Smokey giving odds on the Presidential race. Now that is precious. Are you as good at Presidential politics as you are at NCAA tournament pools, predictions of terrorist attacks and picking FSU as a mortal lock to beat OSU?

    Just wondering.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 7:45 am

  96. Administrator says:

    Apollo

    Thanks for that insight about Ron Paul being the Old Man in the novel. I would have never made the connection.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 7:47 am

  97. Steven says:

    Beautiful article.
    I wish that the concept of freedom would be explored in more depth. I never see it referenced properly, not even Dr. Paul who happens to be a hero of mine – and really, freedom is what we’re talking about here.
    Here’s my working definition of it:
    “Freedom is the state of being able to perform those actions which are necessary for my survival as a non-predatory (toward humans) human.
    The actions which are necessary for my survival are the following:
    To seek the truth in all things.
    To choose.
    To create my identity.
    To survive.

    Those acts are the foundation of all “Rights” and, in fact, provide the morality behind the term. Life is good (moral), death is evil. I do not consider death to be a valid end although in Hemmingway’s case, it probably was. The fundamental choice, after all, is to live or die. And it was his choice.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:00 am

  98. Stucky says:

    RP is just like Jesus, only better.
    wwronpauldam7.jpg

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 7 Thumb down 4

    11th March 2012 at 9:04 am

  99. Richard says:

    I’m very glad Ron Paul is not at all like Hemingway. As a brilliant writer Hemingway was a worthy model, though his influence was greater than it deserved to be. As a man he was not a worth model–a bully, a failure at human relations, a Godless nihilist, a suicide. The hopeless philosophy of this depressing novel was a harbinger of his bloody, disgusting end. Why set him up as a model when thousands of self-sacrificing Christian martyrs endure persecution and death every day around the world? Those who suffer on principle, like those martyrs, like Ron Paul, are far more commendable than anyone who takes a defiant stand against things as they are: Lucifer, Prometheus, Nietzsche, and hundreds of other”heroes” who, as you would say, try to transcend or defy natural law. What kind of fool tries to oppose natural law?

    The Old Man’s valiant. hopeless struggle had more of the nature of mindless machismo, bolstered by a meaningless, existentialist interpretation of life, than of Ron Paul. It’s a cultural crime that Hemingway’s dreary novelette is held up as a great, life-affirming work. Humanistic, man-affirming, Christ-denying it was; but it was no more like-affirming that his final meaningless act which was such an eloquent commentary on the man’s life and work.

    While I admire Ron Paul, and somewhat agree with the anti-government sentiments of Paul, Mr. Quinn, and Hemingway, I heartily DISAGREE with the lionized of Hemingway or his Old Man as a model of life.

    Richard

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 2 Thumb down 14

    11th March 2012 at 9:31 am

  100. Welshman says:

    KYTT,

    Thanks for commenting. Hope to hear more from you.

    Novista,

    Thanks for sharing about your wife, it was moving.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:36 am

  101. Richard says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

    Poorly-rated. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 18

    11th March 2012 at 9:47 am

  102. Administrator says:

    Richard

    You are an ideologue. Your monologue is filled with hatred, even though you attempt to come across as an intellectual. I heartily don’t care what you think. As with any great novel, you can choose the lessons you want to take from it. You clearly have a contempt and hatred for Hemingway, so you let that hatred color anything you might read.

    People who fancy themselves as intellectuals are the sharks that attack that which is good in our world. Keep stewing in your hatred. It becomes you.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 9:48 am

  103. Administrator says:

    Richard

    You should crawl back into you hole of hatred and preach to someone who will believe your crap. I’m ashamed that someone as ignorant and hateful as yourself ventured onto my blog. Don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out, you hateful motherfucker.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 14 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 9:52 am

  104. Administrator says:

    Thank you to Richard for dropping by and confirming my statement in the article:

    “The ideologically myopic pundits that pass for the intelligentsia”

    Richard fancies himself as part of the intelligentsia with his hatred spewing disguised by his attempt to appear morally superior to the far more intelligent members of this site. He is an example of those that think they can control our lives because they are more intelligent and know better.

    I love when one of these trolls wanders onto the site, so we can see them for what they really are.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 10:00 am

  105. WO Jackson says:

    Excellent!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:11 am

  106. Smokey says:

    Richard,

    “Mr. Administrator, if I’d known what a foul mouthed, shallow sophist you are, I’d have spared myself the effort of trying to inform you.”

    Tell you what.

    You want to inform?

    You can inform my dick, you self-righteous sanctimonious cocksucking shit.

    (with apologies to AK Anon relatives)

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 3

    11th March 2012 at 10:22 am

  107. AKAnon says:

    Smokey-No problem. I cut & pasted Jim’s article, but as always, the comments are no holds barred. Rip Richard the fuckstick a new asshole for all I care.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 10:28 am

  108. Smokey says:

    Thanks AK Anon—–consider it done.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 10:46 am

  109. Colma Rising says:

    Novista: Got it…

    Admin: You nailed it with that Richard chump.

    Akanon: You sent this one out? I’m tempted. I wonder what “sharks” would appear if it went to op-ed like admin was saying…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:52 am

  110. The Dog says:

    Nice essay, however, there is one glaring problem with Ron Paul and all the libertarians of the Mises School of thought, and that is the advocacy of the “Gold Standard”

    I suggest you follow the below link to find out why, and perhaps if you are open minded, adjust your views Jim.

    https://libertyrevival.wordpress.com/documents/economic-conspiracy/

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 2 Thumb down 7

    11th March 2012 at 12:36 pm

  111. Administrator says:

    From Simon Black of Sovereign Man

    Is This A “Jobs” Super Committee?

    Earlier this month, some economic luminaries in the United States Congress introduced a new bill, H.R. 2835. The bill intends to “establish a joint select committee of Congress to report findings and propose legislation to restore the Nation’s workforce to full employment…”

    Great idea, fellas. After failing to ignore your way out of recession, spend your way out of recession, lie your way out of recession, and print your way out of recession, you now intend to legislate your way out of recession.

    This bill exemplifies how completely clueless the leadership is, and highlights the common demeanor of the political class. By definition, people are in government because they believe that government is the solution, not the problem.

    Legislating your way to full employment is as fantastical as prancing unicorns and the Tooth Fairy. It’s impossible. The only employment created by legislation are government jobs to staff all those new agencies and bureaus. And naturally, those jobs must come with some task, some responsibility.

    With each new job is created an additional burden upon the taxpayer, and an additional bureaucratic hurdle for the productive class. From opening a bank account to going to see the doctor, things that used to be simple are now fraught with paperwork and regulation, just so some government worker somewhere has something to do.

    Here in South Africa is an absolutely mind-numbing example of this mentality. A few years ago, the city of Cape Town installed digital parking meters– the high-tech kind where you could pay the parking toll on your mobile phone through an SMS… or the good ole’ fashioned way with coins should you so choose.

    Then some politician decided they needed to create more jobs. So the city hired a bunch of workers to go through town ripping out the digital parking meters. In their place, the local government hired a small army of curbside parking attendants– human beings to replace the machines.

    If you think this was a triumph of humanity over profit, then I have a modest proposal… let’s turn the clock back across all industries. We can build roads with hand-laid stone, dig canals with shovels, and hire legions of street sweepers armed with bristled brooms to keep our cities clean. Just think of all the jobs we’ll create!

    Fact is, these sorts of moves are wastefully inefficient, and I shudder to think of what insane ideas would come out of the ‘jobs super-committee’ proposed in this new House bill.

    Governments don’t create value, they destroy value. And the only way for more jobs to be created and money to start flowing again is for the market to perform its function matching willing buyers and sellers, producers and consumers.

    The uncomfortable truth about the global economy is that the old way of doing things is gone forever. Monetary stability, social cohesion, political credibility, traditional career paths, investment assumptions… these are all changing. The game is being reset and the new rules are being rewritten.

    The future is about creating value: what problem can you solve that’s so important to someone else that he/she would be willing to pay you for it, or trade for something that you value?

    Everybody’s good at something. Hell, everybody’s usually good at a lot of things… from designing websites to cutting grass. “You have an overgrown lawn? I have a lawnmower. Let’s make a deal.” The greater the problem, and/or the more people it affects, the greater the reward.

    None of this requires any government involvement; it simply requires a motivated individual to get out there in the world, figure out what needs to be done, and kick ass to make things happen.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 2:19 pm

  112. Stucky says:

    “Well, “Stucky,” I hope Ron Paul can forgive your sins and save you from the wrath to come.” –Richard

    Well … Dick …. I am already suffering wrath ……….. I live in central Jersey. Hell will be a vacation.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 2:56 pm

  113. llpoh says:

    Hey – ten down one up for my analysis of RP’s chances. Logic has no place in any conversation regarding RP.

    Ok – I will sswitch sides.

    It is now clear to me that R00P will win in a landslide. Absolutely. He is the bringer of light and all will see this fact shortly – including the FSA and all of the left-wing whackjobs.

    He cannot lose.

    Let the thumbs up rain down on me now.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 3 Thumb down 13

    11th March 2012 at 6:38 pm

  114. Smokey says:

    llpoh,

    If your post gets read, there will be so many thumbs up it will probably crash the fucking blog.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 7:15 pm

  115. Colma Rising says:

    Had to thumbs-down, because you mentioned it….

    If it was that easy, Perry and Bachman would declare themselves small-government TEA party candidates and, with the aid of these soft-headed talk radio jocks, the run-of-the mill knee-jerk rupublican would actually believe it!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:54 pm

  116. Dave Doe says:

    Religous fervor has nothing to do with logic. Sort of like trying to use standard units of measure when talking about Smokey’s Pole.

    Survey Says ….

    191-0930060044-ron_paul_rocks.jpg

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 4

    11th March 2012 at 7:56 pm

  117. Colma Rising says:

    At least you didn’t get your comment hidden like Smokey.

    Awesome.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:57 pm

  118. AKAnon says:

    Colma, Yes I sent the article to some friends & family. God love ‘em (and so do I, someone has to), but I have relatives who voted for Obama last time. They are very literary, and hopefully fans of Hemingway. I hope they are seeing the error of their 2008 choices, and if they are looking for an alternative, I aim to push them towards RP. I also have neo-con relatives who will vote for whomever the Reps pick. Less likely they will endorse RP, but I can dream.

    Unfortunately, they all live in So Cal, so their vote is unlikely to mean anything anyway. But if they each tell 2 friends, who each tell 2 friends, and so on, and so on, and….

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:28 pm

  119. Colma Rising says:

    Today, Newsjunkie hath opened Pandora’s Box on TBP.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:11 pm

  120. Apollo says:

    @Admin

    Yes I see Ron Paul as the Old Man. But Old Man can be very useful. Sort of like Paul Volcker coming back for a year to fix a few things. Just that to run extremely demanding political campaign, to win, to govern, it is better for Younger Man.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:29 pm

  121. Colma Rising says:

    Erica Goldson for POTUS!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:40 pm

  122. newsjunkie says:

    Doc,
    You have taken it to a whole new level! I’m in stitches.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:29 pm

  123. Timeisrunningout says:

    Well done. This is the top article posted on TBP in the last 3 years. Perhaps because it ends with hope that Ron Paul has started a movement that will outlast his life on earth. I think people are really starting to get it regarding the foolishness of our leadership since we went off the gold standard and created bubbles to mask the root cause of our decline.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:32 pm

  124. KSH says:

    You guys are a riot. I love this postboard. The article and the comments are pretty darn good. I didn’t like Hemingway or anyone who reportedly killed themselves, like Curt Cobain, because I think that there are too many negative assumptions in their thinking that they spread to others minds too, like my sons. For instance, “even if you win, you will fail”. It is true that spiritual wealth is better to have than material wealth, but the spirit will never tell you to kill yourself. I think it is really sad that Hemingway was being followed and reports show the FBI had recorded many hours of surveillance too. So, I think they kind of pushed his insanity along.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 11:49 pm

  125. Novista says:

    Appreciate your comment, Welshman.

    Sometimes grim stories have to be shared.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 5:29 am

  126. Administrator says:

    newsjunkie

    You’ve created a monster. AWD has found his true calling.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:54 am

  127. newsjunkie says:

    55cd30dc-5c83-448c-bdad-0371da041f1b.jpg

    nurseratchedca128632137395898937.jpg

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:01 am

  128. eugend66 says:

    I Like that, alot !

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:21 am

  129. Administrator says:

    Ron Paul Says He’s Realist on ’12 Chances

    Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul said his party and the public have adopted his critical views of the Federal Reserve, building his influence heading into 2012.

    “Who would have ever dreamed that after 100 years, we’d be talking about the Federal Reserve at debates?” Paul said today at a breakfast with reporters in Washington. “Our success in what we’re doing is beyond expectations. There’s no reason to rule out the fact that this can’t just explode.”

    Paul, a Texas congressman, trails the top-tier Republican presidential contenders in public polls. He said he’s a “realist” about his own prospects, and that his backers may play an important role in the party’s nominating contest.

    “I’m running hard. I’m encouraged. I’m a realist. I know what the story’s all about,” Paul said at the breakfast, sponsored by the Christian Science Monitor. While he said it was “premature” to speculate on how his supporters could affect the party’s nomination, he said, “If my momentum continues, I think our delegates will not be insignificant, and they may play an important role.”

    Paul, 76, who has made criticizing the Federal Reserve his hallmark for decades, said Texas Governor Rick Perry, who is leading the Republican primary polls, has adopted a similar message because the public agrees with it.

    ‘Treasonous’
    Perry’s assertion in August that Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s actions might be “treasonous” was “ a sign that he knows that the Federal Reserve is a significant issue, so I’m pleased that he says things like that,” Paul said. “There’s an anti-Fed attitude,” he added, saying Perry’s remark “reflects the changing attitudes, and it was good politics.”

    Paul, who tied for third place among Republican contenders in a Bloomberg National Poll conducted Sept. 9-12, said he is often overlooked by the national media and political establishment.

    “I’m not surprised and I don’t get too annoyed. I know how the system works, and it’s been that way for a long time,” Paul said. Still, he said his message has struck a chord with the public.

    Americans “are sick and tired of the Fed, and the spending, and the debt, and a 10-year-war that we’re not going to win,” Paul said, referring to the U.S. military effort in Afghanistan.

    He also said the U.S. shouldn’t intervene to help Greece out of its financial crisis, and instead should “allow the correction to occur.”

    “Greece should declare bankruptcy, and we should not bail them out,” Paul said.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 4:22 pm

  130. Muck About says:

    @Novista: Thanks for sharing. I would have firmly grasped Nurse Troppo Ratchit and tossed her out on her ass.

    I am a very firm believer in self determination as to when, where and how to leave this mortal coil. I think it is up to the individual to determine (if he/she is strong enough to think it out in advance) the way they die. After all, dying is the last thing you get to do on this earth and I for one, want to do it right and not leave a mess behind for anyone to clean up.

    But first, you have to admit you’re mortal and draw a line in the sand that, when crossed, allows you to take action to die with dignity and your loved ones understanding what it’s all about. Once you’ve accepted what is, sooner or later, going to happen, plan for it, prepare for it and then forget all about it and live the rest of your life, half of each day as if it is your last on earth and the other half of the day as if you were going to live forever.

    MA

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 5:48 pm

  131. Novista says:

    Muck About

    Thanks for your comment. Excellent point of view, especially the last part. Half and half. Brilliant.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 2:51 am

  132. Stan says:

    I would like to point out that Hemmingway only killed himself after he went to a psychiatrist who gave him electric shock treatment and after that, he could not write any more.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:11 am

  133. TeresaE says:

    Amen Stan, amen.

    And this was considered “scientifically proven” when they were doing it to him. Same as it was “fact” that bleeding you out was good and the earth was flat.

    This reason alone leads me to wonder how millions of otherwise intelligent Americans, even those that have opened their eyes to the fiscal realities, refuse to believe that the same misguided and faulty science is “proven” when it comes to popping ten separate poisons approved by their doctors.

    I am an equal opportunity doubter, I doubt ANY and ALL info being released that is filtered in some way from our government.

    Hemmingway believed that the doctors, and the scientific community, knew best.

    I will learn from his lesson.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:33 am

  134. string says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

    Poorly-rated. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 17

    11th March 2012 at 12:19 pm

  135. Administrator says:

    String

    You’re a dangerous liberal douchebag who masturbates while looking at pictures of fat Al Gore and polar bears while drooling over Paul Krugman’s latest hate filled NYT screed.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 12:24 pm

  136. Administrator says:

    string

    I would have supported abortion in one case only. Your mother should have used the coat hanger method to remove the parasite within her. She knew it was wrong to have sex with that monkey at the zoo.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 12:27 pm

  137. Colma Rising says:

    String got his name at birth when his unsuspecting moms, thinking him a mere menstrual cramp, removed her tampon and PLOP!…

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 1:18 pm

  138. string says:

    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

    Poorly-rated. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 16

    11th March 2012 at 3:45 pm

  139. AWD says:

    String:

    The responses you received clearly had nothing to do with politics, but more along the lines of you being a douchebag.

    I hope you will see the light that being a liberal POS is what is destroying this country. I hope you wake the fuck up and get off the tracks, because the train is coming and you and your liberal jerk-off friends are going into the fire with all the rest of the trash.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 3:52 pm

  140. Administrator says:

    string

    See. I rest my case. I go through life dealing with reality, not the fantasy bullshit of left wing ideologues who think they know better than those they look down upon. Liberal left wingers who fancy themselves to be the intelligentsia of the country know their keynesian solutions and redistribution of other people’s money are the best way to control the population. Left wingers like yourself have a disgust and hatred for the average American and want to control the lives of as many people as possible.

    Your ilk have left the country with a $14.6 trillion debt, $100 trillion of unfunded liabilities, and half the population dependent upon your social welfare system, created by your saviors FDR, LBJ and Obama.

    I feel sorry for America that people like yourself somehow are still listened to by the mindless non-thinking portion of the population.

    Have a nice weekend. I’m sure you will be looking down upon the masses from your ivory tower.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 3:54 pm

  141. string says:

    I’m not a Keynesian or a pseudo-Keynesian Monetarist or whatever the fuck these guys like Greenspan, Bernank, Krugman, et. al aspire to be. I happen to agree with RPs stance on monetary issues. Esp. w.r.t. the FRB and a debt based monetary system.
    I think the welfare state has failed us miserably for several generations.
    However, RP is not the kind of person I can get behind.
    I’m a left-libertarian (ala Noam Chomsky) or as one friend likes to say an Anarcho-syndicalist.
    With your knee-jerk responses and assumptions, you miss the mark completely. But, like I said, that is par for the course, and not unexpected.
    It is a big and complex world, and I’m sure you find it difficult to fit everything into neat, simple, little compartments. Maybe that’s why there’s always so much anger simmering.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 2 Thumb down 12

    11th March 2012 at 4:09 pm

  142. Administrator says:

    String

    I knew you wouldn’t resist the opportunity to respond, even though you acted like you were leaving for the weekend. I love when douchebag trolls like yourself enter a website and take a big shit with this opening line and expect to be treated with respect:

    “RP is a dangerous populist right-wing pseudo-libertarian racist quack.”

    Your opening line revealed yourself to be a pseudo intellectual ideologue who clearly prefers hateful false rhetoric rather than a discussion of issues. Any critical thinking member of society (of which you are clearly not a member) knows that Ron Paul is not dangerous, populist, rightwing or racist.

    Your statement is a perfect example of how left wingers treat others. Lies, misinformation and demagogery are all that spews from the left. You may fancy yourself a left libertarian, but you are nothing but a hate monger.

    I always find it hysterical when internet trolls like yourself open with a derogatory blast and then act like the return fire was undeserved. Go crawl back into the hole from which you came, you worthless piece of shit.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 4:42 pm

  143. Colma Rising says:

    String:

    So you have a candidate in mind that will remotely, and honestly (key word) do what he says, mean what he says and point the country anywhere near your mark?

    You’re motherfucking the wrong guy. Your first post was so full of vitriolic shit that you earned every response. Go now… kneel at the bust of your billionaire masters who undoubtedly fund your favorite reading… and await your very own money shot.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 4:44 pm

  144. string says:

    I seem to know everything about your knee-jerk responses. They’re worn out, tired and, frankly pretty boring.
    Anyway, have fun with your RP campaign. I honestly hope you guys make it onto the GOP (or whatever) ticket for 2012. Sadly, I think Wall St. will be pushing their bitch, Mr. Soetoro, into a second term. Hopefully, you guys will learn something along the way. I know it’s a long shot, since one must be open minded in order to learn. But, hey there’s always a chance.

    Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 2 Thumb down 9

    11th March 2012 at 4:47 pm

  145. Colma Rising says:

    Hey String:

    Your skank was the talk of the town, so I figured I’d give the old village bicycle a whirl…

    I was unimpressed.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 4:50 pm

  146. Administrator says:

    string

    Tired and boring about sums up this battle of wits with a hate filled nitwit.

    Have fun with your one friend who likes to have his Anarcho-syndicalist give it to him good and hard.

    The next time you come to a gunfight, don’t come with your dick in your hand.

    Knee jerk response you expected?

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 4:53 pm

  147. string says:

    You guys really are the best.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 3

    11th March 2012 at 4:59 pm

  148. Thinker says:

    String’s writing and insults are remarkably similar to Brigitte’s on the Schwetty Balls thread.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:22 pm

  149. Novista says:

    Wow, when I read “RP is a dangerous populist right-wing pseudo-libertarian racist quack”, I thought “Don’t feed the troll!”

    Then I saw that eating the troll was better.

    The rest of stringy’s diatribe salvo was soooo 2008. For all his big and complex, and uncompartmented thinking, all he brought to the gunfight was a toy pistol with wet and old caps. Just as well, surrounded by all those strawmen, one spark would have created self-immolation.

    Joseph Schumpeter would have been pleased.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 2

    11th March 2012 at 6:46 pm

  150. Colma Rising says:

    Thinker:

    If it was Briggite, then she re-registered.

    I do detect a style from somewhere… but I dismiss that intuitionbecause the first post was out of a Moveon playbook.

    String could have a chance if it reinvented itself.

    Second String?

    It’s not as if the following posts were unacceptable, hell, I’m somewhat of a lefty in a populist sense (like the Xthreads on the 4th T forum) but sheeeeot… come in like a cock and run like a chicken is pretty strange.

    SES

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:52 pm

  151. Novista says:

    string, btw

    “too old to enjoy life” … LOL. I’m 75 and enjoying every moment — especially watching a show reminiscent of the Roman arena, lions attacking the weak. And weak certainly describes the thinking of one who still believes the left-right paradigm. The two Janus faces of the One Party system is doomed to destroy itself.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 6:56 pm

  152. Administrator says:

    String was a newbie. First time IP address. I hope he comes back.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 7:56 am

  153. AWD says:

    Adnim:

    Check this out. A real-life episode of “Old Man and the Sea”

    Monster blue marlin caught after 28-hour battle off Cabo San Lucas
    http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/blog/30401/monster+blue+marlin+caught+after+28-hour+battle+off+cabo+san+lucas/

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:16 pm

  154. Thinker says:

    Great find, AWD. Awesome story.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:27 pm

  155. AWD says:

    Thinker:

    It was a great “catch”. hahaha

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:31 pm

  156. Jennifer Hyatt says:

    Hi all.

    A bunch of us grass roots supporters are throwing him a moneybomb. It is called Black THIS Out. I am sure you have noticed how much the media is ignoring Ron, so we are going to have the largest event of the year and that might get them to notice us! This time around we have a facebook page that we are pushing….http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=181997088537471 and we have a website…blackthisout.com. If you could help spread the word, that would be wonderful!

    The event is being held on Oct. 19th…the anniversary of the day the British surrendered and we won the Revolutionary War. I figure we might try to win a second revolution on that date.

    Any mention would be incredibly helpful. We are trying to spread the word to as many Ron Paul supporters as possible. As always, on Oct. 19th, people are told to donate directly to the official Ron Paul website…http://www.ronpaul2012.com/ That way everyone can feel safe donating. If you are maxed out, there is a SuperPac for Ron called http://www.revolutionpac.com/.

    Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:13 am

  157. Guest Post: The Old Man And The Sea | | FISHING WORLDFISHING WORLD says:

    [...] Submitted by Jim Quinn of The Burning Platform [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:38 pm

  158. AWD says:

    This was a great thread, from beginning to end. Admin reminiscing. Things have changed haven’t they? Great piece admin.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:05 pm

  159. Colma Rising says:

    OMG

    Am I an anarcho-syndicalist now?

    Lol

    Nah. Still a dunce.

    Three sheets in the wind…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:54 pm

  160. Kill Bill says:

    The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; the second is war. Both bring a temporary prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. But both are the refuge of political and economic opportunists.” – Ernest Hemingway

    True. No. Yes. Agreed.

    What didnt work this time around was the temporary prosperity..the broken windows are still broken.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:32 pm

  161. Kill Bill says:

    Hopefully, you guys will learn something along the way. I know it’s a long shot, since one must be open minded in order to learn. But, hey there’s always a chance. -String

    How, prezactly, is this, what you posted, in any way open minded?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:36 pm

  162. Kill Bill says:

    Hey String, I posit your an idiot, but once you realize that your an idiot, you might be able to learn something, I dunno, like how to think like me. I tell you this only because I am ‘open-minded’

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:38 pm

  163. flash says:

    simply awesome, Jim.
    You’ve become quite the wordsmythe , topping every article you pen with the next.
    You really should get an agent.
    best wishes…
    fa

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 1:04 pm

  164. Three Sheets In The Wind says:

    You see them, comments, Administrator?

    Yeah, you’re a great writer… on top of that you’re an admirable human being.

    What would you do if you did the year’s events in review?

    I’ll tell you what… You’d be overwhelmed. A whole lot of shit has come and passed… passed the short attention span of the viewing public, that is… but has it passsed really? Where would one start? The Arab Spring? Quantative Easing and the Silver Bounce of the spring? Ron Paul, the Old Man and the Sea? Boots in the faces of peace?

    Would it be the “Tea Party” flop in congress? Would it be the oil of Libya or the Bear in China?

    Nah. Fuck all that.

    It would be the mirror’s reflection of us all.

    You’ve made me proud, Administrator, every step of the way. You write with heart and use your head. Ideology is but a crutch… your humanity has shown time and again that not only can you make do perfectly when the crutch is kicked away, but more importantly, you are in your element when you throw it away, or better yet, use it to beat those who think they have you pinned about their fat heads with ease.

    You make me proud because you aren’t full of shit. You’re a human being, and every word shows it.

    You aren’t afraid to show it… your humanity… and that alone places you in a unique spot in this remarkable blogosphere of contrarianism. Sure, it’s a small corner in the world with a small pedestal to perch upon…

    It is a quality pedestal. It isn’t a transient pedestal. It’s YOUR pedestal, and time will surely show it is where “it’s” at.

    From metropolis to countryside, you will have a home. I guarantee your readers would agree. Sure, you’re not raking in the dollars for it, but should you ever need, you will NEVER go without.

    Chin up, Mr. Q… You’re not done yet.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 7:07 pm

  165. Gitano says:

    Hemingway was the original expat…..

    I would come back to Africa but not to make a living from it. I could do that with two pencils and a few hundred sheets of the cheapest paper. But I would come back to where it pleased me to live; to really live. Not just let my life pass. Our people went to America because it was the place to go then. It had been a good country and we had made a bloody mess of it and I would go, now, somewhere else as we had always had the right to go somewhere else and as we had always gone. You could always come back. Let others come to America who did not know that they had come too late. Our people had seen it at its best and fought for it when it was well worth fighting for. Now I would go somewhere else. We always went in the old days and there were still good places to go.”

    Ernest Hemingway, 1934

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:16 am

  166. Lonejack says:

    @ Colma Rising:

    “A powerful piece. It flies in the face of the “whoever dies with the most toys” bullshit that many Libertarian-oriented folks have.”

    Go to hell, CR. This underhanded swipe at libertarians is an ignorant mischaracterization so passe that its rejoinder no longer warrants courtesy. I am inclined to wonder whether you are confusing “libertine” with “llbertarian.”

    Libertarians revere RP. Even my anarchist friends, who refuse to vote on philosophical grounds, honor him for his courage and integrity. Among my many libertarian friends and associates, I find a few congenital rule-haters, curmudgeons, hermits, misfits, nerds, and misanthropes, but I have yet to encounter someone who buys into the “most toys bullshit.”

    If your cavalier assertion refers to the beltway psuedo-libertarians who suck, or seek to suck, at the federal teat, such as the Cato Institute or the Koch brothers, then you should say so, and I would cut you some slack, although even then you should be called out for not knowing what you are talking about.

    To the admin..thank you for your righteous work.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 3

    11th March 2012 at 5:52 pm

  167. Colma Rising says:

    Funny thing happened to me…. A meat-headed blow-hard popped in and took a shot at an old comment…. a comment I stand by.

    LoneJack: Obviously, we know different people. I’ve taken in more libertarian work than most and have great respect for the theory.

    Being a political and economic theory, it is a social science theory. Like most social sciences, those who adhere to it rarely do so in a stringent manner…. In fact, many people I know adhere to that Gordon Gekko bullshit that consider themselves die-hard libertarians.

    I do not consider myself a libertarian because I actually DO know exactly what I’m talking about. Your complete lack of elaboration to your point causes me to conclude that you’re a knee-jerk, soft-headed idealogue. What the fuck are you talking about?

    There is a plethora of “Libertarian” thought… if you think about it, my comment was a stab at the idea that profit is the sole motivation for humanity. This article was a piece that invoked other ideals… honor, constancy, integrity and many more intangibles that Ron Paul reflects. These are qualities that, even if he were a socialist, I would respect.

    So, Lone Jack, if you don’t prove to be a skulking cur and provide evidence that my assesment that you are a knee-jerk window-licker wrong, please do… but be aware that I will run circles around you should you stumble with a comment like that heaping cum-rag you just plopped.

    One more thing: You will refer to me as “Jefe” Colma or Mr. Rising, lest I napalm your posts for the fun of it.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 6:55 pm

  168. Colma Rising says:

    Novista:

    I was thinking the same.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:07 pm

  169. Colma Rising says:

    Where’d you go, Jack?

    ?action=view&current=49bde60bda6e31b1c4213706e24dc50ds50dmonsteridrG.png&t=1324946945378

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:52 pm

  170. Colma Rising says:

    Try that again….

    ?action=view&current=49bde60bda6e31b1c4213706e24dc50ds50dmonsteridrG.png&t=1324946945378

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:55 pm

  171. Lonejack says:

    OK, having reading all subsequent comments, I see that Colma is not the superficial idiot I thought he was. My initial reaction to his crack about libertarians need not have been so defensive. It seems that the survivors on this forum take nothing personally and have elevated the swapping of insults to a mental martial art of sorts – Zen-like in its sublimity. Glad to be here.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:58 pm

  172. Colma Rising says:

    Awe, dammit… I was hoping for a pissing match.

    No worries, Lone Jack, it was a prod at libertarians… I love discussing the philosophy. It is a philosophy of peace and good conduct by the individual. It glorifies, righfully, liberty. Liberty is absolutely more precious than a mountain of gold.

    Ron Paul doesn’t belong to the Tea Party, to Libertarians or to Republicans or anarcho-capitalists, anarcho-syndicalists (whatever the fuck that shit is), or any collective one may think up other than one simple group…

    He belongs to America.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 8:19 pm

  173. AKAnon says:

    Aw shit. It was looking like a bloodbath, but everyone ends up on the same page. Chalk one up for freedom, at the expense of napalm. Kum bah ya, ma’ lord, kum bah ya……

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 9:41 pm

  174. Colma Rising says:

    Akanon:

    Now that you mention it, Lonesome Jack failed to refer to me as Jefe, or Mister.

    Hey Lone Jack:

    You ever feel like you’re dunkin’ into a bowl of cheerios when yur hitting your bitches’ snatch?….

    (Insert reason here)

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:02 pm

  175. Colma Rising says:

    Thumbs down: Come out and fight like a man.

    Here pus pus pus….

    I want a rebuttal

    Here kitty kitty kitty….

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:39 pm

  176. AKAnon says:

    Aw shit, I guess I am the punk tonight. As Stuck says, I am filled with the Holy Spirit. And several shots of Jagermeister. Let’s all just get along.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:39 pm

  177. AKAnon says:

    My last response could be misconstrued-I did not give a thumbs down. Looks like we posted at the same time.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 10:41 pm

  178. Colma Rising says:

    Akanon:

    I love thumbs down…. I just want to argue my points.

    Fucking curs dont have the guts to make their fucking point…

    It’s been a few weeks of tea and crumpets and YAWN.

    Time to roll some morons.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:01 pm

  179. Novista says:

    Lonejack

    Welcome to the zoo. Almost anything can happen here. And usually does.

    If you were around in the Fido BBS days, you may have encountered the LTUAE group. Joining that was a baptism of napalm. Here is somewhat the same. Great fun.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:14 pm

  180. Novista says:

    Colma (O/T)

    I hauled the Casio out earlier. Been sitting in a corner for eight years. Pulled it out of the carton, found what I feared — six D cells still in, fortunately, good quality, didn’t leak. Tossed. Power supply was also in carton, plugged it in, everything works. Yay. Except my hands … one broken knuckle on right hand makes a difference.

    Some of the voices are … well, what do you expect for a coupla hunnert bucks? All I need now is that midi-to-USB cable for the Windows notebook.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 1:43 am

  181. Colma Rising says:

    Novista:

    Old batteries could be trouble…. you just reminded me to check a guitar I never use (it has active pickups… 9v)!

    As for having fucked up hands, I’m in the same boat. Years of work has slowed them down in a major way which sucks because I rarely use a pick, especially on a bass…

    A busted nuck is a major annoyance…. hope you work around it.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 11:00 am

  182. Iain Swan says:

    Sublime writing. I look forward to reading more on this website.
    Ron Paul is the last hope for America and you can tell he has won the argument by his enemies, just today Nouriel Roubini, a greatly overrated thinker and writer, smeared Paul and his supporters.
    I am from Scotland, therefore cannot vote for him, but I hope he succeeds and wish my country could produce a politician like him and restore it’s former glories.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 3:14 pm

  183. Novista says:

    Iain Swan

    Welcome! Thanks for the tip on Roubini, I will go have a look.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:49 pm

  184. Novista says:

    OK, here it is:

    http://nourielroubini.blogspot.com/

    Just a snip:

    “Ron Paul: appealing to black helicopter paranoids, white supremacists, gold standard freaks, laissez faire wackos, antisemites and racists”

    The fucker must mean us. Either he was seduced by the dark side of the Force, or he took the blue pill. Wonder how much they paid him to join the Smear Squad? Another name for my 30-30 list.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 6:58 pm

  185. Novista says:

    Colma

    Well, I have the workaround, Noteworthy Composer … midi input to notation editor — produces a proper score, is editable from keyboard. I don’t think I’ll be playing live in a saloon again, though.

    http://www.noteworthysoftware.com/

    I was trained classical — but I got better. LOL. Both behind my time and ahead, too — in that, when I discovered New Orleans, particularly Jelly Roll Morton, later Scott Joplin and so on. But the Serious People then sneered at jazz; another dozen years or so, and academics were all over “America’s one true art form”. Funny ol’ world.

    It’s possible to convert midi to wav, mp3, ogg, or other formats. Third-party Windows software, some of it free, I have no idea of quality.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:34 pm

  186. Colma Rising says:

    NRES

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:40 pm

  187. Kill Bill says:

    1) Barack Obama 3-5

    (2)Hillary Clinton 7-5

    (3) Mitt Romney 20-1

    (4) Rick Perry 45-1

    (5) Michele Bachmann 340 – 1

    (6) Rudy Giuliani 400-1

    (7) Ron Paul 2.1 million to 1

    (8) Newt Gingrich 2.2 million to 1

    (9) Sarah Palin 4.5 million to 1

    (10) Herman Cain 286 million to 1

    (11) Al Huntsman 640 million to 1

    (12) Rick Santorum 311 billion to 1

    Just one question. Is this the order they climb into, or out of, the clown car?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 7:59 pm

  188. Kill Bill says:

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/larison/2011/12/26/ron-pauls-moderate-foreign-policy-and-iran/

    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/12/23/the_world_according_to_ron_paul

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:11 pm

  189. Colm Rising says:

    Novista: I’ll pick up some software tonight…

    Was going jazz back then like Hendrix was to pop rock in the 60′s?

    It was that dam spaniard, wasn’t it!?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 5:43 pm

  190. andy says:

    Matt said, “BTW, who would accept a Romney/Paul or Paul/Romney ticket?” I would not be pleased with it. I would prefer a running mate with the same political ideology Ron carries.

    I got the following in an email:
    NIA just posted its most important video that it has ever produced, ‘The Romney Con’. Mitt Romney is a puppet of the Federal Reserve and Ben Bernanke. If Romney wins the GOP nomination, once again in the Presidential election just like four years ago, Americans will have a choice between two pro-inflation candidates who are exactly the same on all economic issues.

    It is absolutely urgent that you spread the word about this video to every single person you know. The future of our country is at stake. The mainstream media has been manipulating Americans into supporting Mitt Romney, when if elected he will be exactly the same as Obama. Ron Paul is the only real candidate running for President. Ron Paul is our nation’s only hope of surviving hyperinflation, but unless millions of people see this video, it will be very difficult for Ron Paul to defeat Mitt Romney.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:09 am

  191. andy says:

    ‘The Romney Con’ is now available to watch on NIA’s video page: http://inflation.us/videos.html

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    11th March 2012 at 8:10 am

  192. What Ron Paul and Hemingway Have In Common says:

    [...] writers in American history, Ernest Hemingway, we could not resist sharing it, it is from The Burning Platform.com “The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; the second is war. Both [...]

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1

    11th March 2012 at 10:15 am

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